Jason Voorhess has been a staple in most of my teen/adult life. I have been a huge fan of the series since I was traumatized in the 80’s as a young boy in a small town theatre showing Friday the 13th Part 3..in 3-D.


With the advantage that the Internet allows by way of gathering resources and items to be able to put together a costume or a replica, some items STILL require to be found at your local Sally Ann or Good will store. I try not to buy brand new if I can avoid it, and for this build, I was scouring all the Value Villages in Winnipeg to find pants and the “right” kind of shirt.


All in all this was a relatively fast build and that being said, here we go...!


As usual, I started with the most iconic piece of headgear in pop culture. The mask. The original hockey mask that was used in Friday the 13th Part 3 (where it made its appearance) was molded from a Detroit Red Wings goalie mask. The film's 3D effects supervisor, Martin Jay Sadoff, was a hockey fan, and had a bag of hockey gear with him on the set. He pulled out a Detroit Red Wings goaltender mask for the test. Miner loved the mask, but it was too small. Using a fabrication process called VacuForm, Doug White enlarged the mask and created a new mold to work with. After White finished the molds, Terry Ballard placed red triangles on the mask to give it a unique appearance. Holes were punched into the mask and the markings were altered, making it different from Sadoff's mask.


I was fortunate enough to track down a decent looking replica of the mask, but the shape seemed slightly off to me. Taking a heat gun, a pot of boiling water and a few wooden dowels, I set to doing some re-shaping to get a more rounded chin area. After several hot baths, I got the shape I wanted, then set to filling the ventilation holes and cleaning the surface for mold preperation.

I built a clay base to support the mask, and used Smooth On 65 Silicone as my mold material. 65D is super easy to work with and made a nice thick mold in a little under 3 hours. I applied 4 coats to create the mold itelsf, brushing the silicone on to the mask surface directly. It captured the vent and eye holes perfectly for casting, and would be drilled out before during the painting phase.


Granted, the mask still needed some minot touch ups after pulling a resin copy from the mold. Some small air pockets were trapped, creating pock marks on the surface, and easily taken care of with a little spot putty and sanding.

I built a clay base to support the mask, and used Smooth On 65 Silicone as my mold material. 65D is super easy to work with and made a nice thick mold in a little under 3 hours. I applied 4 coats to create the mold itelsf, brushing the silicone on to the mask surface directly. It captured the vent and eye holes perfectly for casting, and would be drilled out before during the painting phase.


Granted, the mask still needed some minot touch ups after pulling a resin copy from the mold. Some small air pockets were trapped, creating pock marks on the surface, and easily taken care of with a little spot putty and sanding.

With the hockey mask ready to go, my next step was to locate a suitable hood to cover my head. I do not usually source out and buy things for my costuming, but as I was not set up for sculpting my own, I did some shoppping around.  I settled with Lubatti Designs when all was said and done. The hood is a great fit, comfortable and allows me just enough space to use with a cloth hood underneath to keep my head warm. The open face allows enough air to circulate and the hockey mask itself is a perfect fit over top.  The accessories were next on the gathering list, as I had already managed to find a shirt and pants that came as close as possible to matching the screen used design. Value Village and Goodwill are the best places to find such “vintage” items instead of buying new. The advantage here is that the clothing is already broken in and the weathering somewhat easier to do.



A used machete and sheath, an army belt, deerskin gloves and a knife all went to adding a more convincing look overall. Further weathering of the clothing were curtosey of various "earthen tone" arclyic paint, black spraypaint, and a lot of physical wear and tear using a barbeque cleaning brush, scissors and hand shredding to get that used decayed look. I was lucky enough to find a mag pouch at a small Army Surplus store to coplete the accessories needed, for less than what I would have spent online to order special.

Want a custom painted hockey mask of your own? They are available HERE!